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Home / News / Trade News / Winner of black rhino hunting auction: My $350,000 will help save the species

Winner of black rhino hunting auction: My $350,000 will help save the species

January 17 2014 – Corey Knowlton is on edge sitting inside a Las Vegas hotel room, surrounded by a private security detail, explaining why he spent $350,000 for the chance to hunt a black rhinoceros in the southern African nation of Namibia.

“If I sound emotional, it’s because I have people threatening my kids,” Knowlton told CNN. “It’s because I have people threatening to kill me right now [that] I’m having to talk to the FBI and have private security to keep my children from being skinned alive and shot at.”

Knowlton was outed over social media as the winner of the Dallas Safari Club’s auction for a black rhino hunting permit from the Namibian government last weekend (12 January 2014). It didn’t take long for the threats and vitriol to start pouring in.

“You are a BARBARIAN. People like you need to be the innocent that are hunted,” posted one woman on Knowlton’s Facebook page.

Some sounded even more sinister. “I find you and I will KILL you,” read another threat. “I have friends who live in the area and will have you in there sights also,” wrote another commenter.

“A hunter afraid of being hunted?! How do you think the rhino feels idiot?” responded one woman to Knowlton’s fears.

Despite the backlash, Knowlton has decided to engage the raging debate over how to protect an endangered species, such as the black rhino, by putting down his own money to help save the species and raise awareness about wildlife conservation.

“I respect the black rhino,” said Knowlton. “A lot of people say, ‘Do you feel like a bigger man?’ or ‘Is this a thrill for you?’ The thrill is knowing that we are preserving wildlife resources, not for the next generation, but for eons.”

Knowlton, 35, is a Dallas-based hunting consultant for The Hunting Consortium, an international guide service. He’s also the co-host of a hunting show on The Outdoor Channel called “Jim Shockey’s The Professionals.” Knowlton’s online biography says he’s hunted more than 120 species on almost every continent.

Hunting has long been a passion of his — Knowlton said he started hunting as a young boy. He said he grew up poor, but made a good living in oil production.

“I’m a hunter. I want to experience a black rhino. I want to be there and be a part of it. I believe in the cycle of life. I don’t believe that meat, you know, comes from the grocery store. I believe that animal died and I respect it,” Knowlton said Thursday night on CNN’s “Piers Morgan Live.”

He describes himself as a passionate conservationist and desperately wants to explain to his critics why hunting one old black rhino can help save critically endangered species around the world. He knows it’s a difficult conversation full of scathing-hot emotion.

Humane Society: We’ll block his trophy

The Humane Society opposed the Dallas Safari Club Auction and says it plans to fight Knowlton’s efforts to bring the black rhino trophy into the United States.

If Knowlton does hunt and kill the black rhino, he’ll need a special permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to import the animal into the country under the Endangered Species Act.
Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The Humane Society, wrote in an online blog post that killing one endangered animal to save the species is an “Orwellian idea” and worries that it will inspire hunters to pay millions of dollars for the chance to kill orangutans, elephants or tigers.

“Where will it end?” wrote Pacelle. “The first rule of protecting the rarest animals in the world is to protect each living member of that species.”

But Knowlton argues that, in this instance, killing one black rhino will protect the species throughout Namibia and that this idea is supported by scientists and conservationists around the world.

Of the world’s approximately 5,000 black rhinos, about 1,700 are in Namibia.

Knowlton says the Namibian government has identified a handful of black rhinos that can be hunted. These are animals that are old, no longer capable of breeding and are considered a dangerous threat to other younger animals.

He said the threat to the rhino is from its own kind. “One of the other ear-tagged killer rhinos is going to injure it. And then either lions or hyenas are going to drag it down. It’s going to die [in] a horrible manner, slowly.”

So Knowlton argues, why not let a hunter pay a massive amount of money to take out a threat to the rest of the species. The Dallas Safari Club says the $350,000 paid by Knowlton will be donated to the Namibian government’s black rhino conservation efforts.

“As much as I would love them all to live forever, they are going to die,” said Knowlton. “The older males are killing each other, and something has to be done about it.”

Knowlton’s supporters: Science backs him up

Knowlton’s supporters say this conservation strategy is based in smart science. The International Union for Conservation of Nature supported the Dallas Safari Club’s black rhino hunting permit auction.

The union says its mission is to work with governments and conservation groups around the world to find “practical solutions” to conservation efforts around the world.

It also says “trophy hunting is a fundamental pillar of Namibia’s conservation approach and instrumental in its success.” And that “well-managed recreational hunting and trophy hunting” have had a positive impact in “stimulating population increases for rhino.”

But other animal rights organizations have criticized this conservation strategy and argue that the better focus would be eco-tourism, raising money from people willing to pay to see endangered animals up close in the wild.

Knowlton says the intense and controversial publicity leading up to the Dallas Safari Club auction scared several serious bidders away. Knowlton said going into the auction there were about 10 serious bidders, but by the time the bidding started, that number had dwindled to about three.

“It was the most unfortunate thing. There were people willing to spend $500,000 to a million dollars,” said Knowlton. “After what I’m going through now, I understand why they decided not to do it.”

Knowlton says he does not yet when he’ll schedule his hunting expedition to Namibia. A great deal of planning and preparation must be done, he said.

Knowlton wants to preserve the black rhino’s hide and then donate the rhino meat to needy communities in Namibia.

“I speak with my heart. I’m passionate about this,” said Knowlton. “I think with the money that I contributed, with everything that is at stake and everything there is to be gained by the world to learn about sustainable use, I think this could be the greatest experience of my life.”

Knowlton says if the hunt doesn’t go perfectly it could also be one of the worst experiences of his life.

“I don’t think it makes me a bigger man; I actually think, Piers, I think it could make me a dead man,” he told CNN’s Morgan.

“This is probably the most dangerous situation that I’ll ever be in outside of walking around right now with all the people that want to kill me.”

Published with acknowledgement to CNN Correspondent Ed Lavandera.

 

  • Help save the black rhino species?! Knowlton seems more concerned about death threats to his family! Well, if that is the case, he should withdraw from the hunt, that is if he loves his family as much as he is expecting the sympathy of the world’s wildlife conservationists. Sympathy is NOT what he will receive from us. He alone has caused this threat to his family! He bought the “right” to kill a rare, endangered black rhino, and expects us to believe his insane idea that killing one will save them all!

    In Namibia there are just under 1000 black rhinos left – in South Africa just over 5000, that’s in total all that is left in the world! I recall a previous video aired on CNN where the Namibian authorities confirmed that Knowlton would have a pick out of 4 or 5 mature bull rhinos, so if all of these rhino are no longer of use to contributing to the increase of populations of the black rhino, it implies that ALL 5 must be killed as they all have aggression and attack other younger males?!! See where I’m going with this… If Knowlton gets away with this hunt, where will it end? It will begin a trend – kill the older bulls, but who will be monitoring which are which?

    NOBODY can justify his actions and Knowlton must not be allowed to continue with his idea of saving other black rhino by killing even one. Why does Knowlton not rather do something really good, like donating the $350,000 to one of the many rhino sanctuaries that do in fact SAVE rhinos.

    Here is South Africa, Karen Trendler of The Rhino Orphanage is one such NPO (http://fightforrhinos.com/tag/animal-babies/) who would use the funds wisely to PROTECT rhino. By donating the auctioned funds, death threats to Knowlton’s family would stop, and he will even get to be a real hero!

  • Is this guy serious? He will help save the species? Well he should be sued for plagiarism because in South Park Episode 206 – The Mexican Staring Frog of Southern Sri Lanka, Uncle Jimbo (a hunter) says: “…we only kill animals to, quote, thin out their numbers. If we don’t hunt, then these animals will grow too big in number and they won’t have enough food. So you see, we have to kill animals, or else they’ll DIE!”

    So it is that type of idiotic philosophy that Knowlton expects us to follow – a cartoon idea. And as for the corrupt Namibia government, they too should hand over ANOTHER $350,000 to the Rhino Orphanage because their action is disgraceful as well.