/* This button was generated using CSSButtonGenerator.com */
Home / Articles / Lifestyle / Vaping Guide For Africa

Vaping Guide For Africa

Are you travelling to Africa and looking to bring your e-cigarette with you? Whether you’re looking for a way to satisfy your nicotine craving while you’re abroad as an ex-smoker, or you simply don’t go anywhere without your vape, it is important to know the rules of vaping in the country that you are travelling to, before you go.

So, take a look at our guide, pack up your favourite vape juice flavours and your e-cigarette, and jet off to the most cultural continent on the planet.

Vaping in Northern Africa

If you’re heading to Morocco or other countries in Northern Africa such as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, or Tunisia, then there are a few things that you will need to know. While the vaping regulations are relatively uncertain due to many African countries not having instituted any yet, some of the main tourist destinations will have some rules in place. For example, if you’re travelling to Egypt, you are unable to vape in public despite e-cigarettes technically being legal (although there is much debate about this as a result of their theoretical ban put in place in 2015). Therefore, we recommend vaping inside your hotel room and checking before you travel.

In Morocco, however, there are no regulations in place meaning you should be able to vape both in public and in private. There is also an indication that you may be able to find vape shops in some of the major cities such as Marrakesh and the importation of both e-cigarettes and e liquids is also legal. In the other North African countries, ensuring that you check before you travel is the best course of action as the situation remains somewhat unclear.

Vaping in Southern Africa

While the regulation in most of Northern Africa is unclear, Southern Africa has much clearer regulations in place for vapers. For example, in South Africa, you are able to purchase e-cigarettes and e-liquids while you’re in the country as well as bring your own. Smoking cigarettes in public spaces like malls and restaurants are illegal but vaping is left to the discretion of the owners (and also the vapers) as there is nothing specific that regulates (or prohibits) its use. The rules in this particular country continue to remain hazy as the government is looking to implement a number of restrictions over time.

In Lesotho, Swaziland, Madagascar, Mauritius and Zambia, you are able to vape in designated smoking areas, but it is advised to bring your own supply of e-liquid and e-cigarettes as you may struggle to find a vape shop in these countries. In other Southern African countries, you will find that e-cigarettes are entirely legal and are also regulated as if they were typical tobacco products.

Vaping in Eastern & Western Africa

A large majority of countries in both Eastern and Western Africa have unclear e-cigarette regulations, possibly due to the technology not being widespread in these countries. However, if you are heading to Kenya, Benin, or Senegal, then you should be able to vape freely. If you’re heading to Ghana or Sierra Leone, then you will need to stick to designated smoking areas when smoking in public. If you are heading to Togo on the other hand, you will find that both vaping and smoking is banned in public, similar to the rules in Ethiopia.

Vaping in Central Africa

In Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, and Congo, e-cigarettes are classified as legal, whereas in Chad and Gabon you will need to stick to designated smoking areas although vaping is still legal here. The central African Republic and Equatorial Guinea’s rules are uncertain in regards to e-cigarettes, so it is best to avoid vaping in these countries or speak to a dedicated travel expert in these countries to determine the best course of action.

Prior to making the trip, you should always speak with an expert in order to ensure that vaping is entirely legal in the country you are heading to. Laws around vaping are constantly changing, and with the technology still somewhat in its infancy, governments around the world are still looking at how they can regulate e-cigarettes in a fair manner.